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Subjective Perception of Time and a Progressive Present Moment: The Neurobiological Key to Unlocking Consciousness

Lynds, Peter (2003) Subjective Perception of Time and a Progressive Present Moment: The Neurobiological Key to Unlocking Consciousness. UNSPECIFIED. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The conclusion of physics, within both a historical and more recent context, that an objectively progressive time and present moment are derivative notions without actual physical foundation in nature, illustrate that these perceived chronological features originate from subjective conscious experience and the neurobiological processes underlying it. Using this conclusion as a stepping stone, it is posited that the phenomena of an in-built subjective conception of a progressive present moment in time and that of conscious awareness are actually one and the same thing, and as such, are also the outcome of the same neurobiological processes. A possible explanation as to how this might be achieved by the brain through employing the neuronal induced nonconscious cognitive manipulation of a small interval of time is proposed. The CIP phenomenon, elucidated within the context of this study is also then discussed.


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Item Type: Other
Keywords: Time, present moment, consciousness, nonconscious, self-awareness, cognition, phi phenomenon, CIP phenomenon, memory.
Subjects: General Issues > Models and Idealization
General Issues > History of Philosophy of Science
Specific Sciences > Cognitive Science
Specific Sciences > Physics
Depositing User: Peter Lynds
Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2003
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2010 11:12
Item ID: 1360
Public Domain: No
URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/1360

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