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Ethology, Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology

Griffiths, Paul Edmund (2006) Ethology, Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology. [Preprint]

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    Abstract

    In the years leading up to the Second World War the ethologists Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen, created the tradition of rigorous, Darwinian research on animal behavior that developed into modern behavioral ecology. At first glance, research on specifically human behavior seems to exhibit greater discontinuity that research on animal behavior in general. The 'human ethology' of the 1960s appears to have been replaced in the early 1970s by a new approach called ‘sociobiology’. Sociobiology in its turn appears to have been replaced by an approach calling itself Evolutionary Psychology. Closer examination, however, reveals a great deal of continuity between these schools. At present, whilst Evolutionary Psychology is the most visible form of evolutionary psychology, empirical and theoretical research on the evolution of mind and behavior is marked by a diversity of ideas and approaches and it is far from clear which direction(s) the field will take in future.


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    Item Type: Preprint
    Keywords: evolutionary psychology ethology sociobiology human behavioral ecology Darwinian anthropology instinct innateness
    Subjects: Specific Sciences > Psychology/Psychiatry
    Specific Sciences > Biology > Evolutionary Psychology
    Depositing User: Paul Edmund Griffiths
    Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2006
    Last Modified: 07 Oct 2010 11:13
    Item ID: 2643
    URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2643

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