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What do light clocks say to us regarding the so-called clock hypothesis?

Bacelar Valente, Mario (2018) What do light clocks say to us regarding the so-called clock hypothesis? THEORIA. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science, 33 (3). pp. 435-446. ISSN 2171-679X

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Abstract

The clock hypothesis is taken to be an assumption independent of special relativity necessary to describe accelerated clocks. This enables to equate the time read off by a clock to the proper time. Here, it is considered a physical system–the light clock–proposed by Marzke and Wheeler. Recently, Fletcher proved a theorem that shows that a sufficiently small light clock has a time reading that approximates to an arbitrary degree the proper time. The clock hypothesis is not necessary to arrive at this result. Here, one explores the consequences of this regarding the status of the clock hypothesis.


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Item Type: Published Article or Volume
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Bacelar Valente, Mariomar.bacelar@gmail.com
Additional Information: ISSN: 0495-4548 (print)
Keywords: light clock; proper time; clock hypothesis; relativity
Subjects: General Issues > History of Philosophy of Science
Specific Sciences > Physics > Relativity Theory
General Issues > Thought Experiments
Depositing User: Unnamed user with email theoria@ehu.es
Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2018 20:41
Last Modified: 13 Dec 2018 20:41
Item ID: 15442
Journal or Publication Title: THEORIA. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science
Publisher: Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea / Universidad del País Vasco
Official URL: http://www.ehu.eus/ojs/index.php/THEORIA/article/v...
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1387/theoria.18143
Subjects: General Issues > History of Philosophy of Science
Specific Sciences > Physics > Relativity Theory
General Issues > Thought Experiments
Date: September 2018
Page Range: pp. 435-446
Volume: 33
Number: 3
ISSN: 2171-679X
URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/15442

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