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Where would we be without counterfactuals?

Price, Huw (2013) Where would we be without counterfactuals? [Preprint]

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Abstract

Bertrand Russell’s celebrated essay “On the Notion of Cause” was first delivered to the Aristotelian Society on 4 November 1912, as Russell’s Presidential Address. The piece is best known for a passage in which its author deftly positions himself between the traditional metaphysics of causation and the British crown, firing broadsides in both directions: “The law of causality”, Russell declares, “Like much that passes muster in philosophy, is a relic of a bygone age, surviving, like the monarchy, only because it is erroneously supposed to do no harm.” To mark the lecture’s centenary, I offer a contemporary view of the issues Russell here puts on the table, and of the health or otherwise, at the end of the essay’s first century, of his notorious conclusion.


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Item Type: Preprint
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Price, Huwhp331@cam.ac.uk
Keywords: Russell, Cause, Causation, Monarchy, Republicanism, Ramsey
Subjects: General Issues > Causation
General Issues > Decision Theory
Depositing User: Prof Huw Price
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2013 12:49
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2013 12:49
Item ID: 10040
Subjects: General Issues > Causation
General Issues > Decision Theory
Date: September 2013
URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/10040

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