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Systemic functional adaptedness and domain-general cognition: broadening the scope of evolutionary psychology

Lundie, Michael (2019) Systemic functional adaptedness and domain-general cognition: broadening the scope of evolutionary psychology. [Preprint]

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Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology tends to be associated with a massively modular cognitive architecture. On this framework of human cognition, an assembly of specialized information processors called modules developed under selection pressures encountered throughout the phylogenic history of hominids. The coordinated activity of domain-specific modules carries out all the processes of belief fixation, abstract reasoning, and other facets of central cognition. Against the massive modularity thesis, I defend an account of systemic functional adaptedness, according to which non-modular systems emerged because of adaptive problems imposed by the intrinsic physiology of the evolving human brain. The proposed reformulation of evolutionary theorizing draws from neural network models and Cummins’ (1975) account of systemic functions to identify selection pressures that gave rise to non-modular, domain-general mechanisms in cognitive architecture.


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Item Type: Preprint
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Lundie, MichaelMichael.Lundie@utdallas.edu
Keywords: Adaptation; Connectome; Modularity; Rich Club; Systemic Function; Selection Pressure
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Biology > Evolutionary Psychology
Specific Sciences > Cognitive Science
Specific Sciences > Biology > Neuroscience
Depositing User: Michael Lundie
Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2019 14:37
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2019 14:37
Item ID: 15578
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Biology > Evolutionary Psychology
Specific Sciences > Cognitive Science
Specific Sciences > Biology > Neuroscience
Date: 7 January 2019
URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/15578

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