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Diversity and homophily in social networks

Fazelpour, Sina and Rubin, Hannah (2022) Diversity and homophily in social networks. [Preprint]

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Abstract

Diversity of social identities can improve the performance of groups through varied cognitive and communicative pathways. Recently, research efforts have focused on identifying when we should expect to see these potential benefits in real-world settings. While most research to date has studied this topic at individual and interpersonal levels, in this paper, we develop an agent-based model to explore how various aspects of homophily, the tendency of individuals to associate with similar others, affects performance at a larger scale. Study 1 examines how two types of homophily---identity-driven and opinion-driven---impact collective performance on a sequential decision-making task via modulating network formation and trust relations. Study 2 considers how the presence of identity-based conformity pressure can affect the findings from the first study. Overall, we find that the effect of homophily on performance is complex, depending on the operative dimensions of similarity, mediating pathways, and the specific outcome of interest. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for policy interventions aiming to improve group performance.


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Item Type: Preprint
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Fazelpour, Sinasina.fa@gmail.com
Rubin, Hannahhannahmrubin@gmail.com
Additional Information: Forthcoming in the Proceedings of the 44th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Keywords: diversity; social networks; homophily; assortativity; trust; conformity; computational modeling
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Cognitive Science
General Issues > Computer Simulation
General Issues > Science and Policy
General Issues > Social Epistemology of Science
Depositing User: Dr Hannah Rubin
Date Deposited: 15 May 2022 04:00
Last Modified: 15 May 2022 04:00
Item ID: 20595
Journal or Publication Title: Proceedings of the 44th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Cognitive Science
General Issues > Computer Simulation
General Issues > Science and Policy
General Issues > Social Epistemology of Science
Date: 2022
URI: http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/20595

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